Jefferson Bass is coming May 11!!

Dr. Bill Brockton is back with a new forensic puzzle to solve – but this time the clues are 2,000 years old and the solution may be earth-shattering.

                Find out more about his latest adventure, The Inquisitor’s Key, when his creators, journalist Jon Jefferson and forensic anthropologist Dr. Bill Bass, the writing team Jefferson Bass, return to Huntsville on Friday, May 11, at 7 p.m. Their program will be presented in the atrium of the Main Library, 915 Monroe St. Admission is $10 in advance, $15 at the door. Buy tickets online at huntsvillelibraryfoundation.org.

                When the novel opens, Brockton’s protégé Miranda Lovelady is helping excavate a newly discovered chamber beneath the Palace of the Popes in Avignon, France. She finds a stone chest with a stunning inscription: Inside lie the bones of Jesus of Nazareth.

                Faced with a case of unimaginable proportions, Miranda calls on Brockton to help prove or refute the claim. Both scientists are skeptical – after all, fake relics abounded in the Middle Ages – but the evidence for authenticity appears strong.

                Brockton and Miranda link the bones to the image on the Shroud of Turin, revered by millions as the burial cloth of Christ. Then a lab test finds the bones to be 2,000 years old, triggering a deadly tug of war between the anthropologists, the Vatican, and a zealot who hopes to use the bones to bring about the Second Coming – and the end of time.

                Find out more about the authors and their fiction and nonfiction works at jeffersonbass.com.

Questions?

Contact Emma Williams, Director of Development

ewilliams@hmcpl.org
(256) 532-5954, office
(256) 532-5997, fax

Get updates!

Get updates from our Facebook group or by following HsvLibFound on Twitter. New to Twitter? Text follow hsvlibfound to 40404.

Get updates!

Use RSS?  Grab our RSS feed to know when we've updated our site:

Syndicate content

(staff login)

Theme by Danetsoft and Danang Probo Sayekti inspired by Maksimer